Holland College Blog

News and views from around the college

Posts Tagged ‘hands-on learning

Mini Burger Love at the Early Learning Centre

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At Holland College’s Early Learning Centre, educators design activities based on the children’s interests. Lately, the youngsters have been all abuzz about the annual PEI Burger Love campaign that seems to gridlock Island restaurants for the month of April.

Some of the children have heard their parents and siblings talking about the campaign, while others have shared burgers with their parents (a good thing, because some of the 84 burgers on offer this year probably weigh more than some of the children!). It’s pretty safe to say that PEI Burger Love has become, for some families, an annual tradition.

Together, the children and educators organized a Holland College Early Learning Centre Burger Love Day. Educators asked children to suggest ingredients for the HCELC Burger, so it was a concoction constructed by a committee of tiny food critics!

The children went for a balance of healthy toppings such as lettuce, tomato, cucumber, onion, pickle, and cheese, and added a few unusual toppings such as potato chips, gummy worms, marshmallows, chocolate chips, and sprinkles.

They were thrilled with the result and enjoyed the burger they created…which wasn’t that different from a few that are being offered in the real PEI Burger Love campaign. Want a side order of smiley fries with that?

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Holland College Paramedicine students participate in one of a kind applied research project

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There’s an 11-vehicle pile-up on the old runway. A body is sprawled across the ground next to a crushed motorcycle as a wisp of smoke spirals upward. A cable snakes away from a downed power pole. People with injuries ranging from broken bones to head wounds sit in the twisted wreckage or wander around as though dazed. Propane tanks are scattered on the ground. The smell of diesel fuel hangs in the air.

The only sound is the buzz of a UAV, or drone, as it hovers over the scene.

A voice cuts through the buzzing, coming from a built-in speaker onboard the UAV.

“If you can walk, please wave your hand.”

Two of the injured wave their hands.

“Move toward the grass,” the voice instructs them. The two men move away from the wreckage onto the grass that fringes the runway.

“If you are conscious, but can’t get out of your car, please wave,” the voice continues. A few more of the injured signal that they have heard and can respond to the request.

The UAV turns and flies toward a tent some metres away, softly landing on a concrete pad as a paramedicine student accompanied by a preceptor and an adjudicator walks confidently toward the wreckage.

This is a simulation of a mass casualty incident held on an unused runway at Slemon Park, part of a unique applied research project.

Dr. Trevor Jain, medical director of the Holland College paramedicine programs, program director for the new Bachelor of Science in Paramedicine program at UPEI, and chief researcher for the project, explains why it is unique.

“There is anecdotal information about people using UAVs during mass casualty incidents and natural disasters to see what’s going on, but there hasn’t been any research done on the efficacy of using UAV technology as an assessment tool. This is the first applied research in this field in the world,” he says.

The project, which is being led by Holland College’s applied research department, includes UPEI, the Canadian Armed Forces, Island EMS, industry partner Skymetro and some 70 people.

Students from both first and second year Primary Care Paramedicine program were given three tasks. First, to assess the scene to identify potential hazards, second, to triage the injured, and third, to allocate resources. Half of the students performed these tasks the usual way, by walking around the scene; the other half assessed the scene using information collected by the UAV piloted by a trained technician. In the case of the triage exercise, the students using the information from the UAV would then proceed to the site to finish triaging and to allocate resources. These exercises were conducted in daylight and at night to gather as much data as possible.

By using UAVs to do the initial site assessment, first responders are not exposed to hazardous materials, unstable structures such as overturned cars, potentially explosive materials, or armed assailants. The purpose of the research is to determine whether first responders using UAV technology could accurately assess situations remotely in the same amount of time or less than they do by walking through a site.

When the research is complete, first responders will be able to determine whether the addition of a UAV and trained technician to their mass casualty incident team would be beneficial for their team, and for the injured.

Familiar faces at East Coast Music Week

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Deserie Murphy captures footage of the stage being set up in the ballroom of the Delta for the ECMAs.

 Kayla Woodside
Journalism student/Communications intern

As East Coast Music Week leaps into action with busy artists, staff and volunteers a few recognizable faces will be helping to create an explosively successful week at the Delta in Charlottetown.

Holland College students are helping with ECMW as part of their class projects.

First year Marketing and Advertising Management student Bhreagh Gentile is working with the ECMW social media team. She and classmates will be tweeting live at the shows and taking photos.

“We’re tweeting the artists coming up, if our venues are at capacity, just sort of the goings on and taking crowd photos, photos of the performers and just genuinely capturing the whole essence of East Coast Music Week,” Gentile said.

The class will be sending their information out to the public through the ECMW accounts.

“We’re really providing instant coverage of things that are happening around town,” said Michelle MacNeil, who is also in the Marketing and Advertising Management program.

MacNeil is from Cape Breton and said she’s always excited to see what the artists from her area are doing.

Journalism students will also be at the venues capturing video, photos, and organizing interviews to share personal stories with the Island.

Deserie Murphy is working on the broadcast side of journalism and said she’s excited to be a part of the project.

“For today, it’s the first day of ECMW and I’ve just been working on getting footage of the set up and all the stages and seeing how everything is being put up,” she said.

Murphy was scouting out the rooms at the Delta Prince Edward, one of the many venues for ECMW events, to see where she wants to take her piece for the project and what angle she wants to tell her story from.

“We’re just working right now on the groundwork for the rest of ECMW so it should be a great show. A lot of video is being taken, a lot of b-roll and that’s just today – we’re just getting started,” she said.

The journalism students will be posting their work on the Holland College Surveyor as well as directly through the ECMA sites.

Pastry Arts students participate in Kitchen Aid For the Cure competition

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The pastry kitchen at the Tourism and Culinary Centre on the Charlottetown Waterfront was surprisingly quiet the other day, considering that seven of the Pastry Arts students were in the middle of a competition to create a signature sweet treat for Kitchen Aid.

The competition was the brainchild of Kitchen Aid/Whirlpool Territory Manager Lisa Gautreau.

“Kitchen Aid is a strong supporter of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation,” Lisa explained. “When I began my events for Kitchen Aid Cook For The Cure in New Brunswick and P.E.I. last year, I felt the need to have a sweet giveaway – something that would echo the Cook For The Cure cause and, of course, be delicious! I was having difficulty finding a local baker to help me out because, obviously, I would need hundreds of portions for some of these events and I wanted it to be something cheerful, fun and optimistic. I was at The Culinary Institute of Canada in P.E.I. one day when I happened to mention to the culinary program manager, Chef Austin Clements, and Chef Kevin Boyce the trouble I was having finding something to give away at these Cook For The Cure events and simply asked, ‘Wouldn’t it be nice if we threw out a challenge to the students?’ Next thing you know, I was in the office of head Pastry Arts instructor Chef Richard Braunauer, and shortly after that, I was in front of the pastry class throwing them the challenge. Those chefs made this happen. Fast!”

The students appeared unruffled as they prepared their concoctions, all of which looked absolutely delicious when they were plated in preparation for judging. Then they left the kitchen while the adjudication took place.

Brad Hamilton and Jonathan Coates of Alpha Appliance Solutions, and Karen Mair, host of CBC’s Mainstreet, PEI’s afternoon radio show, were the judges. The three took their time sampling the students’ entries, which included Strawberry French Macaroons, Salted-Caramel Chocolate Tarts, Orange Shortbread Cookies, Bi-Layered Raspberry Marshmallow & Rose Water Fudge with White Chocolate, Lemon Cake Pops and Chocolate Filled Coconut Cakes.

The competition was close, but in the end, first place went to Keith Hanna for his recipe for Chocolate Filled Coconut Cakes . Take a look at the recipe, it includes his rationale for choosing this style of sweet…it’s really compelling! Anne Marie Woodgate’s Strawberry French Macaroons took second place, and third place went to Colbi Flanagan for her Salted Caramel Chocolate Tarts.

Keith’s biography and recipe will be posted on the Kitchen Aid website, and he will be invited to attend some of the gala events at which his sweet will be served. He also won a Kitchen Aid mixer. The runners up received Architect series 5-speed hand blenders, one of Kitchen Aid’s newest products on the market.

Chef Instructor Richard Braunauer said that participating in competitions is a good way for students to hone their skills and build their résumés.

“The students need to be organized and able to work under pressure,” he said. “A competition situation really drives that message home.”

Lisa Gautreau said that she hopes the competition will become an annual event.

“These students were keen, competitive and creative. Many of them told me that they were personally affected by breast cancer in their family and wanted to do something to help. I cannot tell you how proud I am for Kitchen Aid Cook For The Cure to be affiliated with this college and these bright young students to help our cause,” she said.

For the students, the competition was a hands-on learning experience and an opportunity to contribute to a great cause. But Lisa said she learned something from it, too.

“It may seem funny and simplistic, but this competition has taught me a valuable lesson. I have a very close friend battling breast cancer. I’ve wanted to do everything and anything to help her. But I am limited in my talents and capabilities. I am not an oncologist, a priest, a counselor, or a dietician. I am simply a lady who sells appliances. But what I can do is mobilize the people around me to inspire them to get cooking and help me raise money and awareness. I can do something worthwhile. And it will matter.”

Written by Sara Underwood

February 13, 2014 at 1:16 pm